Query: Hood

I am looking for cemetery info and confirmation of date death of William Berry Hood and both 1st (Sarah Ann Orr Hood) and 2nd wife Lillian Johnson Hood.
William Berry Hood born 1847 Georgia, died? 1922 Wood County
Sarah Ann Orr Hood, born Georgia, died? 1880 Wood County
Lillian Johnson Hood unknown, believed married William 1881 in Wood County.
William, Sarah and children in 1880 census living in Wood County, nothing after however.
Many family members buried at Maple Springs Cemetery outside Newsome however on recent trip could not find these folks.
Thank you for any help.
David Hicks <dbhicks777@tx.rr.com>

1909 Twister Strikes Near Mineola

CYCLONE WRECKS FARM PROPERTY

Twister Strikes Near Mineola in East Texas.

Special to the Star and Telegram.

Mineola, Texas, Jan. 5 — A cyclone passed north of Mineola late yesterday. It formed three miles west of town, took a northeasterly course, plowed a path four miles, then disappeared. L. C. Johnson’s barn was destroyed. Mrs. H. E. Bryant’s house was blown away. J. E. Burkhead’s home was completely wrecked. His family took refuge in a n nearby ditch and was saved.  No fatalities occurred. The storm’s path was forty yards wide, and was visible to Mineola Citizens.  — Fort Worth (Tx) Star-Telegram, Page 1, Tuesday, January 5, 1909 

 

Query: Hood

 I am wondering if you can help to direct me in my research for my grandfather’s family.  I have census records for 1920, 1930 and 1940 for Henry Lawrence Hood in Wood County.  But I cannot find them listed anywhere as yet in the 1910 census.  There should be Henry Lawrence Hood, Winnie Lee Hood, Milton Charley Hood (born 1907) and Juanita Geneva Hood (born 1909).  I have searched page by page throughout Wood County, Hopkins County, Camp County and parts of a couple of other surrounding counties.  I am under the impression that they had always been in Wood County but I expanded the search when I couldn’t find them there in 1910.  My grandparents were married in 1905, I believe in Wood county.  I have not been able to find him in any census before 1920.  I have genealogy history from another part of the Hood line who states that Henry’s father was Berry Hood (or William Berry Hood) but I haven’t been able to personally confirm that as yet.  I found W B Hood in the 1880 Wood County census as a widower with 3 children older than my grandfather who was not born until 1885.  I have been told that his mother was Berry’s second wife, Lillian Johnson, but I cannot find anything on that except a Texas marriage record (not a certificate, just a record) between W B Wood and Lilian or Lillian Johnson so I am not certain of this being accurate for my family.  My cousin believes that our grandfather was adopted, which could have been the case, I don’t know.  It is unfortunate also that we do not have the 1890 census, as that would have been the first one my grandfather would have appeared in as a 5 year old child.
All of this long explanation is to ask, what records are available through the Quitman Library that might help me in this search?  Would there be any chance of having adoption records?  Are there tax records, property records, school or church records, etc. that I can research?

I seem to have hit a brick wall on that part of my research.  Thanks for a reply.  adroptini@gt.rr.com

Query: Quitman Cemetery

I’m trying to find the name of the cemetery that Gary Allen Brown is buried. All his family knows is that his DOB was 7/24/1958 and his DOD was 3/25/2003. They know he was buried at Quitman, TX, but do not know the name of the cemetery. I have checked all possible names through “Findagrave”, but he is not listed.Can you help me with the name of the cemetery in Quitman where he is buried?

Thanks,
Shelby Johnson
Decatur, AL
Tel: 256-353-7989
email: sjohnson305@charter.net

Comments…We Get Comments

1. Responses (2) to “Mae Etta Johnson:”
First, Charles L.Bookman, on February 2nd, 2010 said: “Thanks for sharing this important part of history.”

Second, Melba Gordon Jones, on February 6th, 2010 said: “I really appreciate you publishing my mothers presentation as part of your newsletter. Thank you so much for sharing our story of our hero who knew that God does have the whole wide world in His hands.”

2. Response to “Member Contact List:”
Sharon Gallatin Phillips, on February 1st, 2010 Said: Dear Members,
I am not as yet a paid member. I have not found family in your area,however, I appreciate your website as I have learned much and the links are helping me also. I am what one might call a newbie. My husband’s family is mostly in Rusk Co., and mine is in Brazos, Madison, and Limestone. To my knowledge they do not have websites near as nice as yours. I do read ETGS also. I am on an extremely set budget, and I appreciate the access to your website.”

3. Comment on “Vertical Files A-B:”
June Powers on November 1, 2009 said: ” Interested in vertical files on Benton and Banks. If significant and not too much, could send $ for copies, or can you send copies via email? Let me know what is appropriate, please. Thanks.

4. Comment on “Help a distant researcher:”
June Powers 0n October 31, 2009 said: “Re the vertical file: Is it possible to receive copies of articles of certain files? I do not expect to be in Quitman again in the near future.”

5. Comment on “WCGS Bulletin Goes Live Sept.15:”
Dorothy Harbin on October 7, 2009 said: “You have done an outstanding job on this project. I can’t wait each day to see what new articles will be listed next. I’ve lost a lot of sleep exploring all that you have done, Keep Up The Great Job.

6. Email received from Linda Winterhoff: “Got the newsletter, glanced at it. It looks great as usual. Saw on the website there are Quitman Family Histories. What is the procedure to get my family info in there, or is there one?? My line is Grogan, basically….

7. Email received from Ron Schell: “That’s a great looking Newsletter! I like the layout and generous use of links for further research. I’m looking forward to reading it carefully. Thanks for your work in putting it together.

8. Comment received from Terri O’Connell on Genealogywise: “I love the set up. You have all the information there and it is easy to find. Which I find is the biggest problem with some of the local societies.
The only thing I would look into changing, is nothing related to the site. If it is possible for the society to set up the ability to join the society on line. Sometimes, it is just easier for those of us at home to do it that way. For instance, NEHGS had an add on Facebook and I was able to click through it and join. Keep in mind it was something I had wanted to do, it was just easier for me to do it this way.
Otherwise, I love the crisp feel to it. Great job!

9. Email received from Kathy Gunter Sullivan, CG: “Certainly you may re-post the item if you think it will be useful to your readers. I visited your site, and your bulletin is extremely well-done and informative.

10. Email received from Geneabloggers webmaster at http://www.geneabloggers.com: You’ve got a great genealogy blog, and I’ve added it to the blog list at GeneaBloggers.”

Mae Etta Johnson

Mae Etta Johnson of Quitman, Texas 1958

Mae Etta Johnson

During her presentation to the society’s January meeting, Leatrice Mason paid tribute to her sister Mae Etta Johnson. A part of it is printed here to share with all members and the public in general.

“… Instead, I chose to tell you about – My Hero – a Quitman Hometown Hero that not many people know about.
As Martin Luther King, Jr., died fighting for equality and justice throughout America, so did my baby sister Mattie Mae Etta Johnson.

“My mother and father (Woodie & Erie Johnson) became proud parents of a baby girl that they named Mattie Mae Etta Johnson on December 17, 1940, in the Muddy Creek Community in Quitman. She was the youngest of the four children, three girls and one boy. My older sister and I are the only two living children today.

“She was known as Mae Etta to everyone who knew her well. She attended Sunday School and church services at the Muddy Creek Baptist Church here in Quitman and united with the church at the age of six (1946) under the pasturage of Rev. J. H. Harrington.

“As a small child, her favorite place to play was under, up and in a tree in the backyard of our house. Her favorite story on the radio was “Uncle Ben”. Her favorite books were the Bible Story Book in Pictures and a book of poems titled, “Pearls along Life’s Sea Shore.” We didn’t have a television and of course no computers back then, so we all read a lot as children. Mae Etta purchased these books with money she saved from her weekly allowance. She realized at a young age that saving money was important as well as studying the Bible. She used some of her savings to purchase her first bible. She loved going to church and was active in the Sunshine Band, YWA, BTU, youth choir and usher board.Mae Etta worked faithfully on 4-H projects and her good-natured disposition made her an idol of her time. One of her greatest anticipations was being a delegate to the district board meetings. She became a regular delegate to the Cypress District Sunday school and BTU Congress and Cypress District Association.If our mother was unable to attend with her, because she had to work, our Aunt Irene Hunter would gladly take her.

“Mae Etta attended W.B. Clark School in Quitman and graduated with honors from high school in 1958. While she was in high school, she began to make preparation to enroll in Bishop College in Marshall, Texas. Bishop College was founded by the Baptist Home Mission Society in 1881. Their drive was to establish a Texas college for black Baptists.

“Mae Etta was well accepted in the Bishop College family. One of her dearest friends and classmates was Thomasine Parker Cleaver who was also a Quitman native. They both entered Bishop at the same time and continued their friendship. Mae Etta maintained her high academic standing throughout her stay at Bishop.

“In 1960, the struggle for equality, freedom and human dignity was strong on the minds and hearts of many students at Bishop including my sister. She gladly displayed her courage by giving a new dimension to man’s hope that one day segregation would end. and defined the Christian faith and affirmed in an unmistakable manner the dawn of a new day. With God’s help, she believed it could be done as she continued to work on God’s program at Bishop College. She was president of the Wednesday night Bible Band and seemed to gain much strength through studying God’s word.

“As a budding junior at Bishop College in 1960, she participated in a sit in demonstration against lunch counter segregation in Marshall, Texas. Several black colleges all across the South were also active in the lunch counter segregation movements during this time. She and many other students were arrested, charged and fined for picketing stores as well as staging mass demonstrations on the Harrison County courthouse lawn. She was fined $50.

“In a few short years, my baby sister achieved the maturity some never reach in eighty years. She saw clearly and wholly the ultimate implications of the struggle for human dignity and identified her future with it. We, the family, wondered how else could she suffer to be arrested without ever once losing the cheerful smile and the utterly wholesome outlook on life which she always possessed? How else could this letter that I will read to you be explained that she wrote to our mother less than 24 hours after she had spent 26 hours in a Marshall jail at the age of 19?

“Here is the letter:

April 3, 1960,
Bishop College
Marshall, Texas

Dear Mother,
How are you? I am fine. I guess you know by now we were arrested Friday evening. We were carried to jail at 8 p.m. Friday evening and we stayed there about 26 hours. We got out Saturday night about 10 o’clock. There were 27 of us girls in my cell. Our lawyer is from Dallas. We were bonded out by Negro citizens of Marshall. We are under $600 bonds. The night in jail was not too pleasant, but it was a comfort to know we’re in there to serve a good purpose. We were in for a good cause and none of us minded it really. If it takes a few days in jail to get equality, I feel it’s worth it. I feel that’s the least I can do. I know that God is with us because he has the whole wide world in his hands. I hope they haven’t given you a rough time. What has been said? Be sure and write and tell me. Give everyone my love. I am going to class and study now. Tell UNK hello. Be sweet, I love all of you. Forgive me if I’ve caused you worry. I have lifted a burden from my heart because of my stand. In God’s name we are going to get out freedom.

Your Baby, Etta

“Our family had a real togetherness and supported her in her struggle. We were devastated when we received the news on August 16, 1960, while Mae Etta, her attorney and another student were driving back to their boarding house, that a railroad­switching engine struck the car and killed her and the attorney instantly. The other student was seriously injured. The accident stunned the Marshall community and the legal cases against the students were dismissed. Shortly thereafter Marshall’s public facilities were de-segregated. We do not understand all the ways of God. We cannot comprehend the reason this beautiful and promising life was ushered so suddenly from time into eternity. Her Christian faith can be shared with all; that God does have the whole wide world in His hands.

“Remembering those who dedicated their lives for civil rights such as Medger Evers, John F. and Robert Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr. and many others, Mae Etta dedicated her life for the cause of getting freedom for her people. She would be proud to see President Obama and his family occupying the White House today.

“We may never see a bronze statue of Mae Etta in a hall of fame somewhere or her letter from jail as a required reading as it once was for every student entering Bishop College, but her epitaph is written in the hearts of all who knew her. No tribute can be too much because Mae Etta did not die in vain.
“The people of Quitman should be proud to know that Mattie Mae Etta Johnson is a part of Black History.”

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