Ideas for getting un-stuck in my family history journey

What do I do next? Ideas for getting un-stuck in my family history journey

[Outline for the February program at the WCGSTX Genealogical Society meeting.]

The meeting was to help members examine how to get started again or on another part of the personal research journey by examining (1) their progress in research (2) in display of their results or (3) with the ultimate placing of of their materials for posterity.

At the end of the program, members were given a worksheet to get started and to share at the March 6-7 p.m. meeting before the business meeting. Those who cannot attend in March can post their plans for getting started in comments below.
Click to go to the worksheet which you may then print out on your home printer.—> The link:(https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B1aUvMGSc0DkcHp3Y1o3T2pTLVNxZF9wUFQ5UUgzZw)

Research
a. Where I am in my family history research
i. People
1. Ancestors (parents, grandparents, etc)
2. Descendants (children, grandchildren, etc.)
3. Collateral relatives (aunts, uncles, cousins)
ii. Details
1. Surnames and/or given names
2. Vitals (birth, death, marriage, etc)
3. Additional information (anecdotes, bios, locations, events, etc.)
Link for ideas on how to approach getting over research brickwalls at FamilySearch.org. (https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Solving_Tough_Research_Problems%E2%80%94Overcoming_Brick_Walls)

b.Where I would like to go with my research
i. Find “lost or unknown” people (and details?)
ii. Fill-in details of known people

c. Where I am in family history display (for myself and/or others)
i. Personal file collection of family group sheets, information, and copies of documents, photos
ii. Framed or posted family tree with or without pictures and/or vital details
iii. Scrapbook(s) of family or individuals with various items including some or all but not limited to group sheets, information, documents or copies, photos.
iv. Written manuscripts of my research including various items including some or all but not limited to group sheets, information, documents or copies, photos using various formats from loose leaf to various bindings
v. Published and printed hard or soft-bound books or DVD (www.lulu.com)(a POD publisher)
vi.Personal pages of family history on the internet which can range from family trees, additional information, pages for an individual, or personal logs or journals of stories, details about the family (http://www.google.com/sites/overview.html), (www.wikitree.com)
vii. Adding family trees and supporting illustrations (as allowed) on the internet (www.wikitree.com)
(WorldConnect family trees http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/) (FamilySearch Trees https://www.familysearch.org/upload)
viii. Placing individuals’ information on internet sites such as Find-a-Grave (http://www.findagrave.com/), or surname or geographic location web pages (Search for my state and county at USGenWeb: http://usgenweb.org/states/index.shtml).

d. Disposition of my research when I am deceased
i. Leaving for relatives
ii. Donating to libraries or other repositories
iii. Uploading to archival sites online (Permanence???)

1940 U.S. Census to be Free on Ancestry.com

PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April 2012.
When complete, more than 3.8 million original document images containing 130 million plus records will be available to search by more than 45 fields, including name, gender, race, street address, county and state, and parents’ places of birth. It will be Ancestry.com’s most comprehensively indexed set of historical records to date.
Ancestry.com is committing to make the 1940 Census free from release through to the end of 2013, and by doing so hopes to help more people get started exploring their family history. As this census will be the most recent to be made publicly available, it represents the best chance for those new to family history to make that all-important first discovery.

Part of a news release from Ancestry.com

We Need Some Help With Queries

We seem to be getting a higher place in search engines for Wood County, Texas genealogy. That means we are seeing more and more queries from people who live too far away to drive or fly to Wood County to research.

This also means those who have subscribed to our website auto email feature are receiving lots of emails. Sorry about that, but it seems to be the price of success.

What we need is more members both living in Wood County and those who live far away who can provide information to queries to start responding to these requests. In the best of all worlds, if we do this for others, we can hope someone will also help us when we are too far away to drive to an area for our own research.

Also, if you contact the person directly when the person provides an email address, please also send a copy (cc or bcc to wcgstx@gmail.com) so that we can share what you have found here for other researchers who might have an interest. A lot of us doing a little share means we can be of more service to more people.

Wood County Tax Rolls Free and Online

FamilySearch has posted images of Texas tax rolls on its site at http://familysearch.org. These are free to search, save, or print and include Wood County tax rolls from 1850 to 1894 at this page: https://familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/waypoint/10990465.The rolls are not indexed yet, but you can browse through them year-by-year and page-by-page. The good news is that when you browse, you will find the rolls were written down alphabetically.

1850 Wood County Tax Roll, Page 1

Top of page two of the 1850 Wood County Tax Roll. Page one is always the title page of that roll with no tax data or names.

Ancestries in Quitman, Texas

Ancestries in Quitman City, Texas

United States Or American: 23.4%
Other Groups: 20.8%
Irish: 15.0%
English: 13.7%
German: 8.7%
French (except Basque): 3.4%
Scottish: 2.5%
Scotch-irish: 2.3%
Italian: 2.1%
Dutch: 2.0%

Source: http://www.citymelt.com/city/Texas/Quitman+City-TX.html
Submitted by: Delene H. Allen, Director, Quitman Public Library

More John T. Potter Family Members

From Member Vi Shirey through an email to member Mark Reid: John T. Potter had four children: Della Potter Tolbert; Alice Donie Ragsdale; Eliza Jane Jarred; and William Albert Potter; all of whom lived in Wood County.

John Potter of Wood County

We have received the following email from member Violet Shirey:

John T. Potter was in the Civil War and is buried at Shady Grove, Winnsboro.

His tombstone does not show he was in the war. Is there any way we can get a medalion or whatever it is they put on tombstones? Will appreciate your help.

I am mailing your information on the Decendants of John T. Potter and information about his millitary record. (Note: We will publish this in the online bulletin and then the newsletter upon receipt. dh)

He was my daughter’s (Linda S. Shirey’s) g g g grandfather.

v.shirey@sbcglobal.net

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