Y. M. B. L. Formed at Alba – 1922

Y. M. B. L. Formed at Alba.

Special to The News.

Alba, Texas, Aug. 10 – The young men of Alba have organized a Young Men’s Business League. The following officers were elected: Thurman Clayton, president; B. H. Wooten, first vice president; Roy Glazner, second vice president; Everette DeWitt, third vice president; T. M. Reavley, secretary; Ralph Hopkins, treasurer; L. W. Reavley, reporter; directors, F. R. McCollum, Wilbur Reneau, J. C. Patton, Troy Holmes, D. Brookshier and Payton McKnight. Dallas Morning News, Friday, August 11, 1922, Section: Two, Page: Twelve, GenealogyBank.com

Brick Walls From A-Z Courtesy of Micheal John Neill

Michael John Neill is a well-known genealogist who gives away information and advice on Genealogy. He also sells information (reasonably priced, I might add) and advice about genealogy. It’s likely he gives it away as a marketing strategy to get our attention to his services (or, no doubt, as many do, to give some of his expertise away as a public service in response to others who have done the same before him). I like his approaches to genealogical research, and I am a consumer of both his free and  paid content. He has a regular weblog which has a variety of tips and his own family research from which we can take ideas to apply to our own at http://rootdig.blogspot.com/. It would be worth your time to go there and take a look.

One of his free offerings is some of his previous materials which were carried in the Ancestry Daily news. I enjoy these lists such as this because they make me think about things I might have missed in my own research.

Read these below, and, perhaps, you will find some new strategies to advance your own family tree. dh

From the Ancestry Daily News 
Michael John Neill — 1/11/2006


Brick Walls from A to Z

This week we discuss the alphabet looking for clues to ancestral brick walls. The list is meant to get you thinking about your own genealogy problems.

A is for Alphabetize 
Have you created an alphabetical list of all the names in your database and all the locations your families lived? Typographical errors and spelling variants can easily be seen using this approach. Sometimes lists that are alphabetical (such as the occasional tax or census) can hide significant clues.

B is for Biography
Creating an ancestor’s biography might help you determine where there are gaps in your research. Determining possible motivations for his actions (based upon reasonable expectations) may provide you with new areas to research.

C is for Chronology
Putting in chronological order all the events in your ancestor’s life and all the documents on which his name appears is an excellent way to organize the information you have. This is a favorite analytical tool of several Ancestry Daily News columnists.

D is for Deeds
A land transaction will not provide extended generations of your ancestry, but it could help you connect a person to a location or show that two people with the same last name engaged in a transaction.

E is for Extended Family
If you are only researching your direct line there is a good chance you are overlooking records and information. Siblings, cousins, and in-laws of your ancestor may give enough clues to extend your direct family line into earlier generations.

F is for Finances
Did your ancestor’s financial situation impact the records he left behind? Typically the less money your ancestor had the fewer records he created. Or did a financial crisis cause him to move quickly and leave little evidence of where he settled?

G is for Guardianships 
A guardianship record might have been created whenever a minor owned property, usually through an inheritance. Even with a living parent, a guardian could be appointed, particularly if the surviving parent was a female during that time when women’s legal rights were extremely limited (read nonexistent).

H is for Hearing
Think of how your ancestor heard the questions he was being asked by the records clerk. Think of how the census taker heard what your ancestor said. How we hear affects how we answer or how we record an answer.

I is for Incorrect
Is it possible that an “official” record contains incorrect information? While most records are reasonably correct, there is always the chance that a name, place, or date listed on a record is not quite exact. Ask yourself how it would change your research if one “fact” suddenly was not true?

J is for Job
What was your ancestor’s likely occupation? Is there evidence of that occupation in census or probate records? Would that occupation have made it relatively easy for your ancestor to move from one place to another? Or did technology make your ancestor’s job obsolete before he was ready for retirement?

K is for Kook
Was your ancestor just a little bit different from his neighbors? Did he live life outside cultural norms for his area. If he did, interpreting and understanding the records of his actions may be difficult. Not all of our ancestors were straight-laced and like their neighbors. That is what makes them interesting (and difficult to trace).

L is for Lines
Do you know where all the lines are on the map of your ancestor’s neighborhood? Property lines, county lines, state lines, they all play a role in your family history research. These lines change over time as new territories are created, county lines are debated and finalized, and as your ancestor buys and sells property. Getting your ancestor’s maps all “lined” up may help solve your problem.

M is for Money
Have you followed the money in an estate settlement to see how it is disbursed? Clues as to relationships may abound. These records of the accountings of how a deceased person’s property is allocated to their heirs may help you to pinpoint the exact relationships involved.

N is for Neighbors
Have you looked at your ancestor’s neighbors? Were they acquaintances from an earlier area of residence? Were they neighbors? Were they both? Which neighbors appeared on documents with your ancestor?

O is for Outhouse
Most of us don’t use them any more, but outhouses are mentioned to remind us of how much life has changed in the past one hundred years. Are you making an assumption about your ancestor’s behavior based upon life in the twenty-first century? If so, that may be your brick wall right there.

P is for Patience
Many genealogical problems cannot be solved instantly, even with access to every database known to man. Some families are difficult to research and require exhaustive searches of all available records and a detailed analysis of those materials. That takes time. Some of us have been working on the same problem for years. It can be frustrating but fulfilling when the answer finally arrives.

Q is for Questions
Post queries on message boards and mailing lists. Ask questions of other genealogists at monthly meetings, seminars, conferences and workshops. The answer to your question might not contain the name of that elusive ancestor, but unasked questions can leave us floundering for a very long time.

R is for Read 
Read about research methods and sources in your problem area. Learning about what materials are available and how other solved similar problems may help you get over your own hump.

S is for Sneaky
Was your ancestor sneaking away to avoid the law, a wife, or an extremely mad neighbor? If so, he may have intentionally left behind little tracks. There were times when our ancestor did not want to be found and consequently may have left behind few clues as to his origins.

T is for Think
Think about your conclusions. Do they make sense? Think about that document you located? What caused it to be created? Think about where your ancestor lived? Why was he there? Think outside the box; most of our brick wall ancestors thought outside the box. That’s what makes them brick walls in the first place.

U is for Unimportant
That detail you think is unimportant could be crucial. That word whose legal meaning you are not quite certain of could be the key to understanding the entire document. Make certain that what you have assumed is trivial is actually trivial.

V is for Verification
Have you verified all those assumptions you hold? Have you verified what the typed transcription of a record actually says? Verifying by viewing the original may reveal errors in the transcription or additional information.

W is for Watch
Keep on the watch for new databases and finding aids as they are being developed. Perhaps the solution to your brick wall just has not been created yet.

X is for X-Amine
With the letter “x” we pay homage to all those clerks and census takers who made the occasional spelling error (it should be “examine” instead of “x-amine.”) and also make an important genealogical point. Examine closely all the material you have already located. Is there an unrecognized clue lurking in your files?

Y is for Yawning
Are you getting tired of one specific family or ancestor? Perhaps it is time to take a break and work on another family. Too much focus on one problem can cause you to lose your perspective. The other tired is when you are researching at four in the morning with little sleep. You are not at your most productive then either and likely are going in circles or making careless mistakes.

Z is for Zipping
Are you zipping through your research, trying to complete it as quickly as possible as if it were a timed test in school? Slow down, take your time and make certain you aren’t being too hasty in your research and in your conclusions.

The “tricks” to breaking brick walls could go on and on. In general though, the family historian is well served if he or she “reads and thinks in an honest attempt to learn.” That attitude will solve many problems, not all of them family history related.


Michael John Neill is the Course I Coordinator at the Genealogical Institute of Mid America (GIMA) held annually in Springfield, Illinois, and is also on the faculty of CarlSandburgCollege in Galesburg, Illinois. Michael is currently a member of the board of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS). He conducts seminars and lectures nationally on a wide variety of genealogical and computer topics and contributes to several genealogical publications, including Ancestry Magazine andGenealogical Computing. You can e-mail him at mjnrootdig@myfamily.com or visit his website, but he regrets that he is unable to assist with personal research.

Copyright 2006, MyFamily.com.

The following article is from the Ancestry Daily News and is (c) MyFamily.Com.  It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the Ancestry Daily News is available at http://www.ancestry.com.

Genealogy Jamboree 2013, Cumberland Gap, Tennessee

We would like to invite everyone to the Genealogy Jamboree in Cumberland Gap, Tn June 6, 7, 8, 2013. With an estimated 50 million Americans that has ties to the area. Just about every state and county has ancestors that pass through the Gap. In June of this year history will come alive in the streets of Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. This FREE one-of-a-kind 3-day event combines genealogy with period re-enactors and craftsmen in a historic setting. Lectures by nationally renowned speakers.

Since genealogy is the primary focus of this event attendees will be able to research their family trees through pedigree charts, family surname tables and the many genealogical/historical societies, which will be represented. You will learn how to start researching your family tree by attending some of the lectures and talking with other interested parties at the event.

This event is open and free to the public. Come and enjoy all 3 days of the event! For further information about this event go to our web site at www.genealogyjamboree.us, or facebook.com/genealogyjamboree

We ask to send in pedigree charts as over 1000 have been and is a hit at the Jamboree. Mail to Genealogy Jamboree dept Gap p.o. box 705 Tazewell, Tn 37879.  Any comments can be emailed to mark@genealogyjamboree.us

Thanks to Secretary Shirley Patrick for sharing this email.

 

Query: Evidence of Confederate Service by Blacks

A Stephen F. Austin University student and historian Noris White Jr., is searching for primary documents and related evidence of slaves and free black men or women who may have served in the Confederate armies as combat infantrymen, wagoneers, servants, and in other capacities either by choice or otherwise for a book he is researching. If you have old letters, official documents, pension applications, etc. which would identify anyone of this nature, White requests you contact him at  nowhite@embarqmail.com.

Re: Filed Deeds after Courthouse Burned

Re-filed Deeds after Courthouse Burned
Is there an index to these?I am trying to locate one for William B. Lindley.

Thanks

Ricky D. Lindley
Mapping / Information Supervisor
1520 K Avenue, 2nd Floor
Suite 250, Plano, Texas 75074
T 972.941.5200
F 972.941.7397
rickyl@plano.gov

Ideas for getting un-stuck in my family history journey

What do I do next? Ideas for getting un-stuck in my family history journey

[Outline for the February program at the WCGSTX Genealogical Society meeting.]

The meeting was to help members examine how to get started again or on another part of the personal research journey by examining (1) their progress in research (2) in display of their results or (3) with the ultimate placing of of their materials for posterity.

At the end of the program, members were given a worksheet to get started and to share at the March 6-7 p.m. meeting before the business meeting. Those who cannot attend in March can post their plans for getting started in comments below.
Click to go to the worksheet which you may then print out on your home printer.—> The link:(https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B1aUvMGSc0DkcHp3Y1o3T2pTLVNxZF9wUFQ5UUgzZw)

Research
a. Where I am in my family history research
i. People
1. Ancestors (parents, grandparents, etc)
2. Descendants (children, grandchildren, etc.)
3. Collateral relatives (aunts, uncles, cousins)
ii. Details
1. Surnames and/or given names
2. Vitals (birth, death, marriage, etc)
3. Additional information (anecdotes, bios, locations, events, etc.)
Link for ideas on how to approach getting over research brickwalls at FamilySearch.org. (https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Solving_Tough_Research_Problems%E2%80%94Overcoming_Brick_Walls)

b.Where I would like to go with my research
i. Find “lost or unknown” people (and details?)
ii. Fill-in details of known people

c. Where I am in family history display (for myself and/or others)
i. Personal file collection of family group sheets, information, and copies of documents, photos
ii. Framed or posted family tree with or without pictures and/or vital details
iii. Scrapbook(s) of family or individuals with various items including some or all but not limited to group sheets, information, documents or copies, photos.
iv. Written manuscripts of my research including various items including some or all but not limited to group sheets, information, documents or copies, photos using various formats from loose leaf to various bindings
v. Published and printed hard or soft-bound books or DVD (www.lulu.com)(a POD publisher)
vi.Personal pages of family history on the internet which can range from family trees, additional information, pages for an individual, or personal logs or journals of stories, details about the family (http://www.google.com/sites/overview.html), (www.wikitree.com)
vii. Adding family trees and supporting illustrations (as allowed) on the internet (www.wikitree.com)
(WorldConnect family trees http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/) (FamilySearch Trees https://www.familysearch.org/upload)
viii. Placing individuals’ information on internet sites such as Find-a-Grave (http://www.findagrave.com/), or surname or geographic location web pages (Search for my state and county at USGenWeb: http://usgenweb.org/states/index.shtml).

d. Disposition of my research when I am deceased
i. Leaving for relatives
ii. Donating to libraries or other repositories
iii. Uploading to archival sites online (Permanence???)

1940 U.S. Census to be Free on Ancestry.com

PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April 2012.
When complete, more than 3.8 million original document images containing 130 million plus records will be available to search by more than 45 fields, including name, gender, race, street address, county and state, and parents’ places of birth. It will be Ancestry.com’s most comprehensively indexed set of historical records to date.
Ancestry.com is committing to make the 1940 Census free from release through to the end of 2013, and by doing so hopes to help more people get started exploring their family history. As this census will be the most recent to be made publicly available, it represents the best chance for those new to family history to make that all-important first discovery.

Part of a news release from Ancestry.com

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