Re: Willingham Query

Ann Mary Warren Hearon Willingham obituary located in our (Obituary) Book W # 2, request was on February 26, 2013. It was located by myself, Dorothy Harbin and copy forwarded to Elaine Shelton for her personal use. This request was done prior to March 10, 2013 at no cost to her. Ms. Shelton was very appreciative for having received this copy by mail.

Thanks to Dorothy  for helping this researcher and sharing the results for the Bulletin.

Query: Obituary and Other Lookups

Question: Does your society do research for folks who don’t live in your area? Do you look up obits? If yes, how do you want to be contacted and what is the rate? If no, does any other organization in the county look up obits?

Answer: We don’t charge for obituary lookups at this time. Members read this blog for query requests (which can be emailed to wcgstx@gmail.com) and, as time permits, a member volunteer does the lookup in our extensive collection of Wood County obituaries. We also have marriage, cemetery, and other vital record resources we can check if requested. We respond by email and also encourage members to share the obituary response here in case others inquire about that individual at a later date. More extensive research can also be performed if a member so volunteers, and any fees would need to be arranged with that member.

Index of 150,000 Plus Courthouse Documents To Be Online

News from the Wood County Democrat newspaper from the last Wood County Commissioners Court meeting is that the county is planning to soon place online about 150,000 courthouse documents dating from 1919. They will be indexed and can be ordered online for a fee of $5.00 per document. This is in cooperation with the office of Count Clerk Kelley Price. The news report of the meeting with details is at this link: http://goo.gl/QYzVR.

Websites For Genealogy

Websites for Genealogy

Blank Forms

http://www.wakefieldfhs.org.uk/Forms%20&%20Charts.htm

http://www.familytreemagazine.com/freeforms

https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Research_Forms

https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Research_Forms#Ancestry.com

 

Help Sites

            http://www.dearmyrtle.com       Great article “January 2009 Getting Organized”  Best article I have ever seen on the subject.

http://www.cyndislist.com/        This is the site recommended by everyone.

http://www.usgenweb.org/        Free can find state and county sites

http://www.txgenweb.org/

www.ancestry.com            Some things may be free.

http://www.findagrave.com/

http://www.census.gov/genealogy/www/

http://ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com/

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/default.asp          Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints (LDS) Closes LDS research library is in Gilmer.  Original records are added to this daily. They request help from you transcribing records.

www.ellisisland.org     Ellis Island offers Free Genealogy Search & tips for your Family Tree Know nothing about this site.

http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/               This is the National Archives, access to federal government records.  I spend hours look for and at things on this website.

Shirley Patrick

Documentation

Documentation

I can’t say it often enough.  Document, Document, Document!!!!!!!!!

Ask yourself the question:  “How do I find this again?”

Website that will write citations:

www.easybib.com

www.citationmachine.net

www.correctclick.com/biblio

I found these by goggling citation, book citation, and How to cite a photograph.

 

Types of Citations:  MLA (Modern Lang. Assn), APA (Ame. Psy. Assn), Chicago/Turabian (Dissertation and Thesis).  MLA is what is used in public schools.

 

Definition of Terms:

Medium:  Print, website, online, e-book: online, URL or key words to search for the website and type of source found in database (there

What do I need to write a Citation?  The citations you will use most often are as follows”

URL:  this is the address line. Usually starts with www. or http:// you can high light it and copy to a word processing document.

 

BIBLE:  The full correct titleMedium; chose entire source or specific book.  I would choose entire source since I am interested in the data pages.  Vol. &/or EditionPlace of Publication , [New York, Boston, Winnsboro, Texas].  If private printing by author [I personally put in mailing address of which I already have the city.  Someone you run across may want to try to buy a copy of the book copyright date © [obtained by typing ( c ) without the spaces, this is different from @], Publisher.  If private printing by author [I personally put in mailing address of which I already have the city.  Someone you run across may want to try to buy a copy of the book].  When I am working with a Bible or Book I always copy the Title page and the reverse.  To eliminate handling the Bible any more than possible I copy or scan the pages containing the data. If handwriting in hard to read I type the information. 

You need to be sure to indicate where the book is kept (Repository).

BOOKFull correct title, Medium, Place of Publication, Copyright Date, Publisher, Author or Authors [If someone just gathers information they are a compiler an identified by COMP.]. Be sure to get the page number of each bit of information.  [I use a spiral notebook to record information verbatim.  I have also photographed the page or copy the pages.] I always record the repository and call number of the book.  If you have to pay someone to go back and look for information this will save time.

 

Newspapers and Journals (print):  (are similar) Title of Source, Title of article, Section, Volume, Issue, Series, Pages [3-5 is inclusive; 3,5 means page 3 & page 5], Publisher, place or city of publication, year (day and date if newspaper), Author or Authors.

            [If it is on the website of the newspaper or journal include the URL also include the day you copied the information.  Keywords would also help]  I tend to make copies of everything to scan in to may computer, Family Tree program and my Ancestry.com Tree.  If I find the newspaper or journal in a database I use the online Database citation.

 

Online Database:  [Check, most databases will print citation at the end of the article.  If the article will not print you may still be able to get a citation at the end of the article]  Title, type of source, Contributors (authors), Database, Publisher/ service provider, date published electronically, and date accessed, URL:.

 

WebsiteWeb address (URL) or Keyword search, Medium, Source type,

Article title, Author or Authors, Online Publication info, Website title, Publisher/source, URL, electronically published, date Accessed. [I personally save the website to a word processing document.]

 

I do not have to cite the website because I just summarized what was needed for each type of citation.  Facts do not have to be cited, but you want to cite where you located you information, so someone else may want to recheck because they have different information that you can recheck or someone may want to check themselves.

Shirley Patrick                                  shp1945@gmail.com

Query: McDowell

Jeannie Waggoner called on Jan 8, 2013, asking for information for a friend she had known about 8 years.  The friend’s name is Sandra Lee Mcdowell, a retired school teacher who doesn’t know when or where she was born.  Her sister, Vicki Lynn Mcdowell, was born in Finley, Ohio and never married.  “Sandy” thinks she may have been born in Michigan, but she doesn’t have a birth certificate.  Also, Sandy doesn’t do computers.  She apparently was married before, I don’t know if he died or they divorced, but she has 3 children, two daughters and one son.  Sandra’s current husband was Michael Taylor and they married in Midland-Odessa.  Jeannie never knew that Sandra had the son until Michael’s funeral in early December.  One daughter used to live in Longview.  The son’s name is David and lives on Oregon, Sandra went to college in Oregon.  Sandra’s father was John Mcdowell and her mother was Mariam Gertrude Bennett.  Someone was born Nov 4, 1941. With this information, I will attempt to find everything I can for Jeannie to help her friend.  I asked if it was possible since Sandra was a retired schoolteacher that there should have been some kind of documents when she got her teacher’s degree.  Jeannie (my friend) and I thought that not knowing any more about your early life is very unusual.  I asked could it have been possible that she had had a stroke.  I went to Ancestry and found an obituary on Michael from the Midland newspaper but my computer wouldn’t bring it up. I thought if nothing else it might have some names of survivors. We’ll see what we can find.     

            At the library and on Ancestry I found the obituary for Michael Taylor. The only survivors named were his wife, Sandra Taylor of Mineola, his mother Cleo Rae Taylor of Odessa, a son Ryan Taylor of Denver City, daughter, Myia Dale Scott of Odessa and 4 grandchildren.  He had died on Nov. 29 in Mineola and this obit was published in the Odessa American on December 1, 2012.

            Also on Ancestry I found Sandra Mcdowell in U.S. School Yearbooks along with a picture of her.  According to this report her estimated birth year was about 1939, and she was age 20 when this picture was made.  The school was Northern Pontiac High School in Pontiac, Michigan, and the year was 1959.  The title of the yearbook was “Avalanche”.  It’s possible that this picture is the Sandra Mcdowell we’re looking for and the approximate birth date is 1939.  With that information, assuming she was born in Michigan, we can write the Michigan state capital and (maybe) get a birth certificate. 

            I also found a 1930 U.S. Census placing John D. Mcdowell in Michigan.  He was single then, living with his father Thomas G. Mcdowell, who was born in Michigan, and his mother Katherine A. Mcdowell, who was born in Pennsylvania.  His siblings named were Thomas M., Lucile , John D. (Sandra’s father), Donald M. , Dorothy M., and 2 others who may have been boarders or relatives living with the family.  Their names were Helen J. Hamilton and Miles D. Hamilton.

            I called Jeannie on Jan. 16 and told her what I had found.  She said several people agreed that Sandra might have had a stroke but she didn’t want to do anything.  I suggested she have it checked because it might just be the first and doctors can use blood thinners and other drugs to prevent them.  I am sending Jeannie the information that I have found along with the picture and if this lady is the one in the picture she or one of us could contact the school or the state records department in Lansing, Michigan to get more information.  

            If this information is not correct, we can use any of these names to further our search.

Jeannie Waggoner’s email is jwaggon10@aol.com.

Submitted by Shirley Bates, Genealogy Research

Y. M. B. L. Formed at Alba – 1922

Y. M. B. L. Formed at Alba.

Special to The News.

Alba, Texas, Aug. 10 – The young men of Alba have organized a Young Men’s Business League. The following officers were elected: Thurman Clayton, president; B. H. Wooten, first vice president; Roy Glazner, second vice president; Everette DeWitt, third vice president; T. M. Reavley, secretary; Ralph Hopkins, treasurer; L. W. Reavley, reporter; directors, F. R. McCollum, Wilbur Reneau, J. C. Patton, Troy Holmes, D. Brookshier and Payton McKnight. Dallas Morning News, Friday, August 11, 1922, Section: Two, Page: Twelve, GenealogyBank.com

Brick Walls From A-Z Courtesy of Micheal John Neill

Michael John Neill is a well-known genealogist who gives away information and advice on Genealogy. He also sells information (reasonably priced, I might add) and advice about genealogy. It’s likely he gives it away as a marketing strategy to get our attention to his services (or, no doubt, as many do, to give some of his expertise away as a public service in response to others who have done the same before him). I like his approaches to genealogical research, and I am a consumer of both his free and  paid content. He has a regular weblog which has a variety of tips and his own family research from which we can take ideas to apply to our own at http://rootdig.blogspot.com/. It would be worth your time to go there and take a look.

One of his free offerings is some of his previous materials which were carried in the Ancestry Daily news. I enjoy these lists such as this because they make me think about things I might have missed in my own research.

Read these below, and, perhaps, you will find some new strategies to advance your own family tree. dh

From the Ancestry Daily News 
Michael John Neill — 1/11/2006


Brick Walls from A to Z

This week we discuss the alphabet looking for clues to ancestral brick walls. The list is meant to get you thinking about your own genealogy problems.

A is for Alphabetize 
Have you created an alphabetical list of all the names in your database and all the locations your families lived? Typographical errors and spelling variants can easily be seen using this approach. Sometimes lists that are alphabetical (such as the occasional tax or census) can hide significant clues.

B is for Biography
Creating an ancestor’s biography might help you determine where there are gaps in your research. Determining possible motivations for his actions (based upon reasonable expectations) may provide you with new areas to research.

C is for Chronology
Putting in chronological order all the events in your ancestor’s life and all the documents on which his name appears is an excellent way to organize the information you have. This is a favorite analytical tool of several Ancestry Daily News columnists.

D is for Deeds
A land transaction will not provide extended generations of your ancestry, but it could help you connect a person to a location or show that two people with the same last name engaged in a transaction.

E is for Extended Family
If you are only researching your direct line there is a good chance you are overlooking records and information. Siblings, cousins, and in-laws of your ancestor may give enough clues to extend your direct family line into earlier generations.

F is for Finances
Did your ancestor’s financial situation impact the records he left behind? Typically the less money your ancestor had the fewer records he created. Or did a financial crisis cause him to move quickly and leave little evidence of where he settled?

G is for Guardianships 
A guardianship record might have been created whenever a minor owned property, usually through an inheritance. Even with a living parent, a guardian could be appointed, particularly if the surviving parent was a female during that time when women’s legal rights were extremely limited (read nonexistent).

H is for Hearing
Think of how your ancestor heard the questions he was being asked by the records clerk. Think of how the census taker heard what your ancestor said. How we hear affects how we answer or how we record an answer.

I is for Incorrect
Is it possible that an “official” record contains incorrect information? While most records are reasonably correct, there is always the chance that a name, place, or date listed on a record is not quite exact. Ask yourself how it would change your research if one “fact” suddenly was not true?

J is for Job
What was your ancestor’s likely occupation? Is there evidence of that occupation in census or probate records? Would that occupation have made it relatively easy for your ancestor to move from one place to another? Or did technology make your ancestor’s job obsolete before he was ready for retirement?

K is for Kook
Was your ancestor just a little bit different from his neighbors? Did he live life outside cultural norms for his area. If he did, interpreting and understanding the records of his actions may be difficult. Not all of our ancestors were straight-laced and like their neighbors. That is what makes them interesting (and difficult to trace).

L is for Lines
Do you know where all the lines are on the map of your ancestor’s neighborhood? Property lines, county lines, state lines, they all play a role in your family history research. These lines change over time as new territories are created, county lines are debated and finalized, and as your ancestor buys and sells property. Getting your ancestor’s maps all “lined” up may help solve your problem.

M is for Money
Have you followed the money in an estate settlement to see how it is disbursed? Clues as to relationships may abound. These records of the accountings of how a deceased person’s property is allocated to their heirs may help you to pinpoint the exact relationships involved.

N is for Neighbors
Have you looked at your ancestor’s neighbors? Were they acquaintances from an earlier area of residence? Were they neighbors? Were they both? Which neighbors appeared on documents with your ancestor?

O is for Outhouse
Most of us don’t use them any more, but outhouses are mentioned to remind us of how much life has changed in the past one hundred years. Are you making an assumption about your ancestor’s behavior based upon life in the twenty-first century? If so, that may be your brick wall right there.

P is for Patience
Many genealogical problems cannot be solved instantly, even with access to every database known to man. Some families are difficult to research and require exhaustive searches of all available records and a detailed analysis of those materials. That takes time. Some of us have been working on the same problem for years. It can be frustrating but fulfilling when the answer finally arrives.

Q is for Questions
Post queries on message boards and mailing lists. Ask questions of other genealogists at monthly meetings, seminars, conferences and workshops. The answer to your question might not contain the name of that elusive ancestor, but unasked questions can leave us floundering for a very long time.

R is for Read 
Read about research methods and sources in your problem area. Learning about what materials are available and how other solved similar problems may help you get over your own hump.

S is for Sneaky
Was your ancestor sneaking away to avoid the law, a wife, or an extremely mad neighbor? If so, he may have intentionally left behind little tracks. There were times when our ancestor did not want to be found and consequently may have left behind few clues as to his origins.

T is for Think
Think about your conclusions. Do they make sense? Think about that document you located? What caused it to be created? Think about where your ancestor lived? Why was he there? Think outside the box; most of our brick wall ancestors thought outside the box. That’s what makes them brick walls in the first place.

U is for Unimportant
That detail you think is unimportant could be crucial. That word whose legal meaning you are not quite certain of could be the key to understanding the entire document. Make certain that what you have assumed is trivial is actually trivial.

V is for Verification
Have you verified all those assumptions you hold? Have you verified what the typed transcription of a record actually says? Verifying by viewing the original may reveal errors in the transcription or additional information.

W is for Watch
Keep on the watch for new databases and finding aids as they are being developed. Perhaps the solution to your brick wall just has not been created yet.

X is for X-Amine
With the letter “x” we pay homage to all those clerks and census takers who made the occasional spelling error (it should be “examine” instead of “x-amine.”) and also make an important genealogical point. Examine closely all the material you have already located. Is there an unrecognized clue lurking in your files?

Y is for Yawning
Are you getting tired of one specific family or ancestor? Perhaps it is time to take a break and work on another family. Too much focus on one problem can cause you to lose your perspective. The other tired is when you are researching at four in the morning with little sleep. You are not at your most productive then either and likely are going in circles or making careless mistakes.

Z is for Zipping
Are you zipping through your research, trying to complete it as quickly as possible as if it were a timed test in school? Slow down, take your time and make certain you aren’t being too hasty in your research and in your conclusions.

The “tricks” to breaking brick walls could go on and on. In general though, the family historian is well served if he or she “reads and thinks in an honest attempt to learn.” That attitude will solve many problems, not all of them family history related.


Michael John Neill is the Course I Coordinator at the Genealogical Institute of Mid America (GIMA) held annually in Springfield, Illinois, and is also on the faculty of CarlSandburgCollege in Galesburg, Illinois. Michael is currently a member of the board of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS). He conducts seminars and lectures nationally on a wide variety of genealogical and computer topics and contributes to several genealogical publications, including Ancestry Magazine andGenealogical Computing. You can e-mail him at mjnrootdig@myfamily.com or visit his website, but he regrets that he is unable to assist with personal research.

Copyright 2006, MyFamily.com.

The following article is from the Ancestry Daily News and is (c) MyFamily.Com.  It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the Ancestry Daily News is available at http://www.ancestry.com.

Genealogy Jamboree 2013, Cumberland Gap, Tennessee

We would like to invite everyone to the Genealogy Jamboree in Cumberland Gap, Tn June 6, 7, 8, 2013. With an estimated 50 million Americans that has ties to the area. Just about every state and county has ancestors that pass through the Gap. In June of this year history will come alive in the streets of Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. This FREE one-of-a-kind 3-day event combines genealogy with period re-enactors and craftsmen in a historic setting. Lectures by nationally renowned speakers.

Since genealogy is the primary focus of this event attendees will be able to research their family trees through pedigree charts, family surname tables and the many genealogical/historical societies, which will be represented. You will learn how to start researching your family tree by attending some of the lectures and talking with other interested parties at the event.

This event is open and free to the public. Come and enjoy all 3 days of the event! For further information about this event go to our web site at www.genealogyjamboree.us, or facebook.com/genealogyjamboree

We ask to send in pedigree charts as over 1000 have been and is a hit at the Jamboree. Mail to Genealogy Jamboree dept Gap p.o. box 705 Tazewell, Tn 37879.  Any comments can be emailed to mark@genealogyjamboree.us

Thanks to Secretary Shirley Patrick for sharing this email.

 

Query: Evidence of Confederate Service by Blacks

A Stephen F. Austin University student and historian Noris White Jr., is searching for primary documents and related evidence of slaves and free black men or women who may have served in the Confederate armies as combat infantrymen, wagoneers, servants, and in other capacities either by choice or otherwise for a book he is researching. If you have old letters, official documents, pension applications, etc. which would identify anyone of this nature, White requests you contact him at  nowhite@embarqmail.com.

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